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St. James Plaindealer - St. James, MN
  • Tuesday Club Meets: Mah Jongg Anyone?

  • Fourteen members of the Tuesday Study Club were present at the Nov. 20, meeting at the home of Linda Beam. Jo Yock’s short program was about turkey growing and turkey trivia. Turkeys are grown mostly in confinement because of the difficulties of weather, snowstorms, and predators when they are grown outdoors. ...
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  • Fourteen members of the Tuesday Study Club were present at the Nov. 20, meeting at the home of Linda Beam.  
    Jo Yock’s short program was about turkey growing and turkey trivia.  Turkeys are grown mostly in confinement because of the difficulties of weather, snowstorms, and predators when they are grown outdoors.  About 45 million turkeys are consumed at Thanksgiving, 22 million at Christmas, and 19 million at Easter.
    Barb Hahnfeldt told about the game Mah Jongg, which originated in China in about 1880 and is still one of the most played games there today.  The game was brought to the United States in about 1920 and was extremely popular during the ‘30s, ‘40s, and ‘50s.  The game is played with small rectangular tiles stamped with symbols and characters.  The name Mah Jongg is loosely translated as “clattering sparrows,” referring to the sound of the tiles when they are mixed or shuffled.  The National Mah Jongg League publishes a card each year which lists various combinations of tiles.  The players pick and discard tiles in order to assemble combinations. The first player to assemble the correct combinations of tiles needed to make one of the hands listed on the card wins.  Every tile has its own symbolism, reflecting culture, ideals, and spiritual values, so the game is played with many symbolic metaphors of life.  Barb enjoys playing Mah Jongg one afternoon a week with a group of other Mah Jongg enthusiasts.
    The next meeting will be a Christmas party on December18th at the home of Myrna Eppeland.  Myrna Eppeland and Clarice Fastenau will serve a luncheon at 1 p.m. and present the program.  Members may bring a Christmas ornament of about $5 for a gift exchange.
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